WOD: Physiotherapy for Crossfit

crossfit

You Crossfit. We get it. You don’t need to define AMRAPs or WODs to us. We know an injury keeping you out of the box just isn’t going to cut it. Whether you’ve hurt yourself on your very first kettlebell swing or have been to the Crossfit Games (like the team at Physics Crossfit who we’re very proud to be treating), we’re here to help.

Crossfit gets a bad rep for being injury prone, but it doesn’t have to be. People get injured because they don’t do the following:

1. Listen to your coach – This is a biggie. You want to get more reps in, lift heavier, go harder, so you won’t slow down or stop to fix up your technique. Let something slide in the beginning and it can lead to big problems as you advance in the sport. Want to get more reps in, lift heavier, go harder? Listen to your coach.

2. Perfect your technique BEFORE increasing your load – yes, we’re making this point again, it is THAT important to avoid injury. Better to do your WOD with a lower weight but perfect technique than increase the weight but do even one with poor technique. When are you going to get hurt? It’s during that one rep where your technique sucks. You’ll get to that higher weight much faster if you don’t have to take time off for an injury. Honest.

3. Listen to your body – Something hurts? Feels weird? Sort it out now. Give us a call and we can set you up with a mobility and stability program that’ll keep anything giving you trouble from getting any worse.

How will we help you stay sorted? It depends on your situation, but we’ll include the following in your physiotherapy sessions:

1. Biomechanical assessment looking for weakness, asymmetry or loss of mobility.
2. Hands on manual therapy for immediate symptom relief and restoration of mobility if you’re already injured, including diagnosis and management guidelines.
3. A personalised rehabilitation program designed and progressed while communicating with you and your trainer.
4. Education on how your body works, what you did to cause the injury/pain and how to prevent further episodes. We’ll also teach you stretching and release/rolling techniques to help with injury prevention.

You’re welcome to come into any of our clinics without a referral, but we do encourage a referral from your trainer so we can all work together to approach your injury prevention or rehabilitation. We want to keep you training, with modifications if required! If you do need to take a break, we want to get you back to the box in the shortest time possible!

Old or recurring injuries? Stop ’em now!

If you’ve been injured in the past or exercise regularly, and haven’t fixed the aches, pains, or sore spots that keep nagging at you, we hear you. Whether you’ve just tweaked a little something that keeps aching or have an injury that keeps on coming back for more, it’s time to get them straightened out so you can be in tip top shape come the sunshine!

Injuries happen, and an ache or pain that dissipates in a few days is usually nothing to worry about. If it’s lasting for weeks or months, or happens to reoccur, that’s a sign that something isn’t quite right, so it’s time to stop ignoring it! Even if the pain is mild, don’t try to be macho – pain can cause your body to alter it’s mechanics which leads to unnecessary stress on joints, ligaments, muscles and tendons.

These pains are likely due to overuse or a small injury to a tendon or muscle. While taking something like ibuprofen can make you feel right as rain, it doesn’t take care of the problem. Exercising through the masked pain and swelling can leads to chronic inflammation, causing weakness, tissue breakdown, more pain, more swelling and BAM! You’re got yourself a nagging injury.

So what do you do? The first step is to apply heat before exercising, and use RICE (Rest Ice Compression Elevation) after training to help control the pain and swelling. It will help you control the symptoms best without having to slow down too much, but again, it’s not going to fix the problem. It’s time to see the physio, be evaluated and figure out what the issue is so you can say buh-bye to that pain-in-the-whatever.

Instead of quitting exercise because something hurts, your physiotherapist will set you up with a personalized treatment plan, including exercise options that won’t aggravate your injury. The plan will also include advice on how to modify your training techniques so you can keep doing the activities you want, but pain free.

Once your physiotherapist helps make that pain a distant memory,  be sure to start ramping up your normal activity slowly. Again, most of these sorts of injuries are due to over training, so getting back at it too hard or too fast will land you right back in injury land!

Don’t get shut out: preventing groin strain

With the Winter Olympics now in full swing, almost everyone in the country is thinking about one thing: HOCKEY! We know offsides and icing are common in hockey, but unfortunately so are groin strains.Whether you are a back yard rink rat or a 2018 hopeful here are some tips to keep you on the ice and off the injury reserve:

WARM UP: this is most often on the injury prevention list because it is SO important! Make sure to warm up completely, including dynamic or movement stretches. If you aren’t sure what that means, ask next time you’re in and your physiotherapist would be happy to explain these to you.
STRETCH THIGHS DAILY: stretch both the inner thigh and outer thigh muscles daily. While tight groin muscles can lead up to a strain, you should also stretch your hamstrings to keep your muscles balanced.
REGULAR MASSAGE & MANUAL THERAPY: regular massages from a massage therapist and regular manual therapy from your physiotherapist helps to keep your muscles flexible. They also help to break down old scar tissue and help with trigger points that could lead to injuries later on.
PRACTICE SPORT-SPECIFIC DRILLS: sudden changes of motion during play can cause groin strains, but practising the movements helps your muscles adapt and become stronger while doing them. Based on the sport your play, and the condition you are in, our physiotherapists can assign exercises specific to your needs. 
WORK ON CORE STABILITY: a strong core is a stable base for the movements you’ll be doing no matter the sport, and can reduce the chance of straining your adductor.
IMPROVE YOUR PROPRIOCEPTION: proprioception is your body’s ability to know what part of it is doing without looking at that part. That seems a bit confusing, but it’s how you can walk up stairs without looking at your feet, or put food in your mouth without a mirror. That seems like the sort of thing you might not be able to improve, but it’s based on balance, coordination and agility. Balance and sport-specific movement work improve your proprioception, improve your stability and all that helps to avoid injury.
STRENGTHEN THIGH & HIP MUSCLES: strengthening the muscles involved in the movement responsible for an injury increases your stability in that area. It is important for preventing injury, but especially for preventing a reoccurrence if you’ve already been injured. Your physiotherapist can determine where your muscle imbalances are, and assign exercises specific to your needs.
REST: make sure you rest! Over training leads to fatigue, which most definitely increases your risk of injury. Use it as your excuse to watch some of the games! Go Canada!

Mathew is now an FCAMPT! Holla!

You may have noticed it’s been pretty quiet around these parts recently. Despite being known as a time for vacations, we’ve been reeeeeaaaaallllllly busy! Mathew especially, and we’re proud to let you know he’s now a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Manipulative Physiotherapy(FCAMPT). Congratulations Matthew!

FCAMPT is the highest orthopaedic designation possible for a physiotherapist (ie. it’s kind of a big deal). Physiotherapists with the FCAMPT designation are all about the highest level of quality, patient-centred care combining clinical experience with evidence-based practice. Exactly what you’d expect from OPTSC. The designation requires extensive post-graduate education in the area of orthopaedics, including internationally-recognized qualifications in hands-on manual and manipulative therapy.
Orthopaedics doesn’t refer to shoe inserts, but muscle, nerve and joint problems. This means a CAMPT physiotherapist is going to do more than just look at your sore back and treat the area between L4-L5. You can expect an assessment that may measure many things: function, strength testing, analysis of your walking patterns, posture, balance, and joint movement to get a full picture of your condition. It’s about the WHOLE picture, not just localized treatment.
When it comes to treating your issue, a CAMPT physiotherapist will use a combination of common physiotherapy techniques like acupuncture, tailored exercises and ultrasound in addition to manual and manipulative therapy. That might sound a little bit daunting, but it’s nothing of the sort. Manual and manipulative therapy refers to how your physiotherapist uses their hands to diagnose places where your movement is being restricted, and the gentle, hands-on techniques they use to treat you.
Struggling with headaches? Low-back pain? Knee arthritis? Ankle pain? Any muscle, joint or nerve condition: give us a call and Mathew, or any of our physiotherapists, would be more than happy to help get you back to pain-free!